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locust eater

What's a Whale-Road?


gail

The sea. It's a poetic device called a kenning.

Horace Jeffery Hodges

What's a whale road? Why, it's one whale of a road!

As you can see above.

(Though, to be quantitatively precise, it seems to be about three whales of a road.)

The Old English people saw this sort of thing, too, and in their astonishment cried, "That's one whale of a road!"

Glad to be of assistance. No need to thank me.

Oh, and it's called a "kenning" because the two joined words are now related to each other.

Jeffery Hodges

* * *

Major John

How would you like to man the toll both on that road...

Learning all sorts of things today; apparently the Scottish word 'Ken' used to mean 'understand' is related. But good golly, it's hard enough to understand people without making up unintelligible jargon. And the ocean is almost, but not quite entirely unlike a road. Whale-road... I've half a mind to go back in time and edit that bit out. The picture is cool tho.

Locust Eater

Hmmm
I am learning all sorts of things today; wikipedia says the Scottish word 'Ken' used to mean 'understand' is related. But good golly, it's hard enough to understand people without making up unintelligible jargon. And the ocean is almost, but not quite entirely unlike a road. Whale-road... I've half a mind to go back in time and edit that bit out. The picture is cool tho.

gail

The Anglo-Saxons had a slightly wry and dry sense of humor in making some of these up, so I'm sure they knew that the ocean was not all that much like a road, but it was what whales traveled on, so...

Ana

It's Elmer Fudd saying rail road.

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