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Comments

Jake

I'll not spoil this one for the others by blurting out the answers. Lord knows I've referred to these enough in my comments =)

prairie biker

1. penii
2. penii
3. the "c" word

JWebb

Tomorrow, I plan to use your Wijit search engine to find all of Jake's previous explanations.

Jake

I havent previously explained them.. I've just asked her to reprint her posts on the subject about a million times.. Remember the post about the medieval scribes and their monkeys with bagpipes? Or the etymology of the c word? Slang terms for poontang and their roots in Latin words for small furry animals? This site has taught me all I know about the history of taboo words.. Now if I can just get selected to play Porn Jeopardy (I'll take Latin names for Punani for $500 please, Alexxx)

Jake

Re: PB's answers.. #2 is incorrect.. Not Penii.. a bunny, or coney, is a small furry animal.. not a heat seaking moisture missile. Do I get any points for spotting his error?

JWebb

I thought a coney was a weinie in a bun. Did they have that in medieval times?

Jake

I've had coneys covered in whipped cream and strawberries and it was great.. covered in chili, relish and/or mustard just doesnt seem all that appetizing to me.. but I'm sure there's a fetish market for it out in L.A.

gail

OK, one point to PB, although he forgot to mention the rather large testicles that are also included in the bagpipe imagery. Then, one point to Jake for clearing up the bunny rabbit issue. The "coney" is indeed the c word, but it is also a word for rabbit, which was the medieval version of another small, furry animal.

Tsitsi

"Konijn" is the dutch word for rabbit and obviously related to "coney", as is "Kaninchen" in German.

They don't have the additional meaning referred to here, though.

Jake

English and German (and presumably Dutch as well..) being closely related, dont they have any 'small fury animal' euphanisms for the female no-no parts? If not, what slang terms do they use?

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