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Scott P

Good morning. Cup of joe, ready for work, it all seems too familiar.

gail

I hope you and Julie and Hankie had a very merry Christmas.

Scott P

It was the best Christmas imaginable, thanks to you.

ken

You know it was a good Christmas when the little one (1 1/2) cries when he has to go to bed...he enjoyed playing with his toys so much.

One word game we started yesterday was trying to think of words with a person's name as a source. A lower-case word (so no Kafka-esque, Solomic or Aristotelian) that is.

A few that sprang to mind were sapphic, platonic, machievellian (a little unclear on that...I'm sure I've seen it used in lower case). I later thought of draconian, so at least I have one to add at our next get-together.

We strayed into classic mythology as well, with words like herculean or procrustean. A fun task since everything will come up and there's plenty of discussion to include it (goliath?). I'd appreciate it if anyone thinks of any more...I need all the help I can get!

gail

How about gargantuan? But I don't think draconian is related to a person's name. It's related to the Latin draco, draconis for dragon.

ken

Draco was one of the first lawgivers in Athens (pre-Solon) and most of the punishments, even for minor offenses, were death. There is the convenience of his name meaning dragon or snake, which has caused a few people to question whether or not he actually existed (also because some things attributed to him happened much later). But the word is definitely tied to him.

gail

Oh, I didn't realize that. Thanks for the etymology Ken.

ken

I just discovered that not too long ago when reading some Greek history. Fascinating stuff, all of which I sadly missed in my 'schooling.'

ken

I forgot one of the easiest...a lay-up in this category: sadistic.

gail

Masochistic, too, from Sacher-Masoch

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